Exercise increases the body’s own ‘cannabis-like' substance which reduces chronic inflammation

Date:

November 17, 2021

Source:

University of Nottingham

Summary:

Exercise increases the body's own cannabis-like substances, which in turn helps reduce inflammation and could potentially help treat certain conditions such as arthritis, cancer and heart disease. ( See Study ) In a new study, published in Gut Microbes, experts from the University of Nottingham found that exercise intervention in people with arthritis, did not just reduce their pain, but it also lowered the levels of inflammatory substances (called cytokines). It also increased levels of cannabis-like substances produced by their own bodies, called endocannabinoids. Interestingly, the way exercise resulted in these changes was by altering the gut microbes. At the end of the study, participants who did the exercise intervention had not only reduced their pain, but they also had more microbes in their guts of the kind that produce anti-inflammatory substances, lower levels of cytokines and higher levels of endocannabinoids.


Obesity raises the risk of gum disease by inflating growth of bone-destroying cells

Findings may improve understanding of chronic inflammatory, bone-related diseases that develop alongside obesity, such as gum disease, arthritis and osteoporosis

Date:

November 12, 2021

Source:

University at Buffalo

Summary:

Chronic inflammation caused by obesity may trigger the development of cells that break down bone tissue, including the bone that holds teeth in place, according to new research that sought to improve understanding of the connection between obesity and gum disease. The study, completed in an animal model and published in October in the Journal of Dental Research, found that excessive inflammation resulting from obesity raises the number of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), a group of immune cells that increase during illness to regulate immune function. MDSCs, which originate in the bone marrow, develop into a range of different cell types, including osteoclasts (a cell that breaks down bone tissue).


Anxiety effectively treated with exercise

Date:

November 9, 2021

Source:

University of Gothenburg

Summary:

Both moderate and strenuous exercise alleviate symptoms of anxiety, even when the disorder is chronic, a new study shows. "There was a significant intensity trend for improvement -- that is, the more intensely they exercised, the more their anxiety symptoms improved," states Malin Henriksson, doctoral student at Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, specialist in general medicine in the Halland Region, and the study's first author. COMMENT: Another important study showing that exercsie can help with anxiety disorders.


Three ways to reduce the carbon footprint of food purchased by US households

Date:

November 3, 2021

Source:

American Chemical Society

Summary:

Most consumers want to make food purchases that are smart for their wallets, their health and the environment. And while switching to a vegetarian or vegan diet can lower one's impact on greenhouse gas emissions, it may not be realistic or healthful for everyone. Now, researchers report three ways that Americans can reduce the carbon footprint of their food purchases, without requiring drastic dietary changes. (Article)

The team's analysis revealed that 71% of homes surveyed could decrease their food carbon footprint, identifying three main ways for consumers to do so. The suggestions are:

          Small households of one or two people should buy less food in bulk quantities, which is often more than will be eaten, and manufacturers should offer cost-effective package sizes.

          Cutting out foods with high caloric content and low nutritional values would result in a 29% reduction of the total potential emissions, while also potentially improving health outcomes.

          People should buy less savory bakery products and ready-made foods. Though those foods are responsible for relatively low carbon emissions, the large amounts of these items that are purchased adds up to significant emissions.

In summary, the researchers say these strategies are initial ways people can reduce their at-home food-based carbon footprint.

The authors acknowledge funding from Purdue University Environmental and Ecological Engineering for providing the Bilsland Dissertation Fellowship.


Can eating alone be bad for your heart?

Date:

November 3, 2021

Source:

The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)

Summary:

As women age, their risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) exceeds men's largely because of decreased levels of estrogen that regulate vascular function. As a result, much research is focused on various risk factors. A new study suggests that eating alone may contribute to an increased risk of heart disease in older women.


The 5:2 diet: A good choice for gestational diabetes

Date:

November 1, 2021

Source:

University of South Australia

Summary:

Weight loss after gestational diabetes can prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes. Yet finding the most effective way to lose weight and keep it off can be a challenge, especially for mothers with a new baby. Now, new research suggests that the popular 5:2 or intermittent fasting diet is just as effective as a conventional energy-restricting diet, enabling women greater choice and flexibility when it comes to weight loss. The research investigated the effects of both the 5:2 diet (five days of normal eating and two days of 500 calories) and a continuous energy-restricted diet (1500 calories per day) on weight loss and diabetes risk markers in women with a previous diagnosis of gestational diabetes. Both diets restricted energy by approximately 25 percent each week. ( Study )


Back pain common among astronauts offers treatment insights for the earth-bound

Research reviews show back pain affects more than 50% of space travelers

Date:

October 21, 2021

Source:

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Summary:

As more people travel into space, experts expect more physicians will see patients with space travel-related pain. ( Article )


Bone mineral density decreases less than expected after menopause

Date:

October 27, 2021

Source:

University of Eastern Finland

Summary:

Bone mineral density at the femoral neck bone in postmenopausal women decreased by an average of 10% during a 25-year follow-up, according to a new study. Being the world's hitherto longest follow-up of changes in bone mineral density in postmenopausal women, the study shows that bone loss after menopause is significantly lower than has previously been assumed on the basis of earlier studies.


Increased consumption of whole grains could significantly reduce the economic impact of type 2 diabetes

Date:

October 25, 2021

Source:

University of Eastern Finland

Summary:

Increased consumption of whole grain foods could significantly reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes and the costs associated with its treatment. COMMENT: Whole grains is and should be part of most people diet.


Cleveland Clinic study links gut microbiome and aggressive prostate cancer

Researchers uncover how diet, lifestyle modifications may lower risk of lethal disease

Date:

October 28, 2021

Source:

Cleveland Clinic

Summary:

Researchers have shown for the first time that diet-associated molecules in the gut are associated with aggressive prostate cancer, suggesting dietary interventions may help reduce risk. While more research will be necessary, the study's lead author says findings from the team's analysis of nearly 700 patients may have clinical implications for diagnosing and preventing lethal prostate cancer.  ( Study )


Genes play key role in exercise outcomes

Date:

October 14, 2021

Source:

Anglia Ruskin University

Summary:

A new study has found that genes can explain up to 72% of the difference in outcome between people after a specific fitness exercise. The research involved data from 3,012 adults and has identified a number of specific genes which influence the outcomes of different physical activities. "Our study found 13 genes that have a role in exercise outcomes, and we found that specific alleles contained within these genes are more suited to certain aspects of fitness. For example, with repetition exercises designed to boost muscular strength, genetic differences explained 72% of the variation in outcomes between people following the same training.

"Because everyone's genetic make-up is different, our bodies respond slightly differently to the same exercises. Therefore, it should be possible to improve the effectiveness of an exercise regime by identifying someone's genotype and then tailoring a specific training programme just for them.

"This could particularly benefit those who need to see improvements in a short period of time, such as hospital patients, or elite sportspeople, where marginal improvements could mean the difference between success and failure."


Research review shows intermittent fasting works for weight loss, health changes

Date:

October 12, 2021

Source:

University of Illinois at Chicago

Summary:

Intermittent fasting can produce clinically significant weight loss as well as improve metabolic health in individuals with obesity, according to a new study.

The review looked at over 25 research studies involving three types of intermittent fasting:

          Alternate day fasting, which typically involves a feast day alternated with a fast day where 500 calories are consumed in one meal.

          5:2 diet, a modified version of alternate day fasting that involves five feast days and two fast days per week.

          Time-restricted eating, which confines eating to a specified number of hours per day, usually four to 10 hours, with no calorie restrictions during the eating period.

Weight loss in both the alternate day and 5:2 fasting are comparable to more traditional daily calorie-restrictive diets. And, both fasting diets showed individuals were able to maintain an average of 7% weight loss for a year.

(See Study)


Illness-and death-related messages found to be significant motivators for exercise

Date:

October 19, 2021

Source:

University of Waterloo

Summary:

Fitness apps that emphasize illness- or death-related messaging are more likely to be effective in motivating participation than are social stigma, obesity, or financial cost messaging, according to a recent study ( Study ). COMMENT: Sometimes as a health coach I have to do bring up these messages because I have found they work.  


Americans are eating more ultra-processed foods

18-year study measures increase in industrially manufactured foods that may be contributing to obesity and other diseases

Date:

October 14, 2021

Source:

New York University

Summary:

Consumption of ultra-processed foods has increased over the past two decades across nearly all segments of the U.S. population, according to a new study.


Data continues to show that American’s need at least 5 hours per week of physical activity to prevent some cancers

Date:

October 14, 2021

Source:

American Cancer Society

Summary:

A new report finds more than 46,000 cancer cases annually in the United States could be prevented if Americans met the 5 hours per week of moderate-intensity recommended physical activity guidelines. A new report finds more than 46,000 cancer cases annually in the United States could be prevented if Americans met the 5 hours per week of moderate-intensity recommended physical activity guidelines. The latest data appearing in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise show 3% of all cancer cases in adults in the U.S. aged 30 years and older during 2013 to 2016 were attributable to physical inactivity and the proportion was higher in women (average annual attributable cases 32,089) compared to men (14,277). ( Study )


Higher fasting ‘hunger hormone’ levels from healthy diet may improve heart health and metabolism

‘Green’ Mediterranean diet linked to elevated fasting ghrelin levels

Date:

October 13, 2021

Source:

The Endocrine Society

Summary:

Fasting levels of the 'hunger hormone' ghrelin rebound after weight loss and can help reduce belly fat and improve the body's sensitivity to insulin, according to a new study. Ghrelin is a stomach-derived hormone that stimulates appetite. Ghrelin levels rise during overnight fasting when a person is sleeping. The levels fall after an individual eats a meal.

The 18m clinical trial study found that dieting induces elevation in fasting levels of ghrelin and that elevation of fasting ghrelin is associated with abdominal visceral fat loss and improving insulin sensitivity. This suggests individuals who have higher levels of fasting ghrelin following weight loss face decreased risk of developing diabetes or other metabolic diseases.

Individuals who followed the green-Mediterranean diet that included a leafy vegetable called Mankai and green tea and omitted red meat had two-fold greater elevation in fasting ghrelin levels compared with of participants who followed a more traditional Mediterranean diet or a healthy balanced diet, which suggests this approach may have additional cardiometabolic benefits.


Strength training can burn fat too, myth-busting study finds

Date:

September 22, 2021

Source:

University of New South Wales

Summary:

A new systematic review and meta-analysis shows we can lose around 1.4 per cent of our entire body fat through strength training alone, which is similar to how much we might lose through cardio or aerobics. The author states: While the findings are encouraging for fans of pumping iron, Dr Hagstrom says the best approach for people who are aiming to lose fat is still to stick to eating nutritiously and having an exercise routine that includes both aerobic/cardio and strength training."Resistance training does so many fantastic things to the body that other forms of exercise don't, like improving bone mineral density, lean mass and muscle quality. Now, we know it also gives you a benefit we previously thought only came from aerobics," says Dr Hagstrom.COMMENT: We consistently say that strength training can change how your body looks and this study proves it.


Common pesticide may contribute to global obesity crisis

Chlorpyrifos slows down the burning of calories in the brown adipose tissue of mice fos

Date:

August 27, 2021

Source:

McMaster University

Summary:

Researchers discovered that chlorpyrifos, which is banned for use on foods in Canada but widely sprayed on fruits and vegetables in many other parts of the world, slows down the burning of calories in the brown adipose tissue of mice. Reducing this burning of calories, a process known as diet-induced thermogenesis, causes the body to store these extra calories, promoting obesity. Scientists made the discovery after studying 34 commonly used pesticides and herbicides in brown fat cells and testing the effects of chlorpyrifos in mice fed high calorie diets.


Research shows exercise-related proteins can suppress tumor growth

Date:

October 5, 2021

Source:

Edith Cowan University

Summary:

New research shows bed and rest might not be the best treatment for people suffering from cancer -- in fact, the opposite may be true. Researchers have discovered the proteins created by the body when exercising - called myokines -- can suppress tumor growth and even help actively fight cancerous cells.


Intermittent fasting makes fruit flies live longer — will it work for people?

Date:

September 29, 2021

Source:

Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Summary:

Intermittent fasting is a trendy weight loss strategy. A new study of fasting fruit flies shows how the diet, if properly timed, also slows the aging process and increases longevity by cleaning our cells. ( Study )


Intense workouts before bedtime won’t guarantee a good night’s rest, new research shows

Evening exercise is better for uninterrupted sleep

Date:

September 28, 2021

Source:

Concordia University

Summary:

A new meta-analysis assessed data from 15 published studies to see how a single session of intense exercise affects young and middle-aged healthy adults in the hours prior to bedtime. And while no two bodies are the same, the researchers did find that the combination of factors would interact to enhance or modulate the effects of exercise on sleep. ( Study )

{}urther analysis provided the following results:

          Early evening high-intensity exercise promoted sleep onset and improved sleep duration, especially when performed by sedentary subjects.

          High-intensity exercise performed between 30 and 60 minutes also improved onset and duration.

          Cycling exercises were found to benefit participants most in terms of onset and deep sleep.

          However, high intensity exercise, regardless of timing, contributed to a slight decrease in the rapid-eye-movement (REM) stage of sleep, the sleep stage which is commonly associated with dreaming experiences. Studies suggests that decreases in REM sleep can impact cognitive tasks negatively if the information is complex and emotionally stimulating but not if the information is easy or neutral.


Healthy changes in diet, activity improved treatment-resistant high blood pressure

Date:

September 27, 2021

Source:

American Heart Association

Summary:

A healthy eating plan, weight loss and improved aerobic fitness can significantly reduce blood pressure and improve heart health in people with resistant hypertension -- a condition in which blood pressure remains high despite the use of three or more antihypertensive medications. People with treatment-resistant hypertension successfully reduced their blood pressure by adopting the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan, losing weight and improving their aerobic fitness by participating in a structured diet and exercise program at a certified cardiac rehabilitation facility, according to new research published today in the American Heart Association's flagship journal Circulation. ( Study ) COMMENT: THIS FALLS IN LINE WITH MANY OF OUR TENETS.


Adjusting fatty acid intake may help with mood variability in bipolar disorders

Date:

September 23, 2021

Source:

Penn State

Summary:

Can specific dietary guidelines help people living with bipolar disorders better manage their health? Clinical trial results showed that a diet designed to alter levels of specific fatty acids consumed by participants may help patients have less variability in their mood. ( Study )


MIND diet linked to better cognitive performance

Study finds diet may contribute to cognitive resilience in the elderly

Date:

September 21, 2021

Source:

Rush University Medical Center

Summary:

Researchers have found that older adults may benefit from a specific diet called the MIND diet even when they develop these protein deposits, known as amyloid plaques and tangles.Developed by the late Martha Clare Morris, ScD, who was a Rush nutritional epidemiologist, and her colleagues, the MIND diet is a hybrid of the Mediterranean and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets. Previous research studies have found that the MIND diet may reduce a person's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease dementia. ( Study )


Researchers call for a focus on fitness over weight loss for obesity-related health conditions

Date:

September 20, 2021

Source:

Cell Press

Summary:

The prevalence of obesity around the world has tripled over the past 40 years, and, along with that rise, dieting and attempts to lose weight also have soared. But according to a new article, when it comes to getting healthy and reducing mortality risk, increasing physical activity and improving fitness appear to be superior to weight loss. The authors say that employing a weight-neutral approach to the treatment of obesity-related health conditions also reduces the health risks associated with yo-yo dieting. (see article).


Meds, surgery may help obesity-related high blood pressure if diet, exercise fall short

Date:

September 20, 2021

Source:

American Heart Association

Summary:

Being overweight or having obesity, weight that is higher than what is considered healthy for an individual's height, is a major risk factor for high blood pressure. A healthy diet, more physical activity and less sedentary time are recommended to reduce blood pressure for people who are overweight or have obesity; however, evidence of long-term weight loss and sustained blood pressure reductions from these lifestyle changes is limited. New weight-loss medications and bariatric surgery have shown benefits in both long-term weight loss and improved blood pressure, which can reduce the long-term, negative impact of high blood pressure on organ damage. (See article).


Scientists claim that overeating is not the primary cause of obesity

Date:

September 13, 2021

Source:

American Society for Nutrition

Summary:

A perspective article challenges the 'energy balance model,' which says weight gain occurs because individuals consume more energy than they expend. According to the authors, 'conceptualizing obesity as a disorder of energy balance restates a principle of physics without considering the biological mechanisms underlying weight gain.' The authors argue for the 'carbohydrate insulin model,' which explains obesity as a metabolic disorder driven by what we eat, rather than how much. *Public health messaging exhorting people to eat less and exercise more has failed to stem rising rates of obesity and obesity-related diseases. *The energy balance model, which says weight gain is caused by consuming more energy than we expend, "restates a principle of physics without considering the biological mechanisms driving weight gain." *The carbohydrate-insulin model makes a bold claim: overeating doesn't cause obesity; the process of getting fat causes overeating. *The current obesity epidemic is due, in part, to hormonal responses to changes in food quality: in particular, high-glycemic load foods, which fundamentally change metabolism. *Focusing on what we eat rather than how much we eat is a better strategy for weight management. (Study)


Researchers observed association between standing and insulin sensitivity – standing more may help prevent chronic diseases

Date:

September 10, 2021

Source:

University of Turku

Summary:

Insulin is a key hormone in energy metabolism and blood sugar regulation. Normal insulin function in the body may be disturbed by e.g. overweight, leading to decreased insulin sensitivity and increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Researchers have noticed that standing is associated with better insulin sensitivity. Increasing the daily standing time may therefore help prevent chronic diseases. COMMENT: YET ANOTHER STUDY POINTING TO THE BENEFITS OF STANDING :) (Study)


Gut microbiota influences the ability to lose weight

Date:

September 14, 2021

Source:

American Society for Microbiology

Summary:

Gut microbiota influences the ability to lose weight in humans, according to new research. "Your gut microbiome can help or cause resistance to weight loss and this opens up the possibility to try to alter the gut microbiome to impact weight loss," said lead study author Christian Diener, Ph.D., a research scientist at the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle, Washington. "Before this study, we knew the composition of bacteria in the gut were different in obese people than in people who were non-obese, but now we have seen that there are a different set of genes that are encoded in the bacteria in our gut that also responds to weight loss interventions," said Dr. Diener. "The gut microbiome is a major player in modulating whether a weight loss intervention will have success or not. The factors that dictate obesity versus nonobesity are not the same factors that dictate whether you will lose weight on a lifestyle intervention." COMMENT: YET ANOTHER STUDY POINTING TO THE BENEFITS OF YOUR GUT MICROBIOME :)


Small changes in diet could help you live healthier, more sustainably

Date:

August 18, 2021

Source:

University of Michigan

Summary:

Eating a hot dog could cost you 36 minutes of healthy life, while choosing to eat a serving of nuts instead could help you gain 26 minutes of extra healthy life, according to a new study.The study, published in the journal Nature Food, evaluated more than 5,800 foods, ranking them by their nutritional disease burden to humans and their impact on the environment. It found that substituting 10% of daily caloric intake from beef and processed meats for a mix of fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes and select seafood could reduce your dietary carbon footprint by one-third and allow people to gain 48 minutes of healthy minutes per day. COMMENT: I AM A BIG ADVOCATE FOR SMALL LIFESTYLE CHANGES:) (STUDY)


Moderate-vigorous physical activity is the most efficient at improving fitness

Physical fitness is a powerful predictor of health outcomes

Date:

August 27, 2021

Source:

Boston University School of Medicine

Summary:

In the largest study performed to date to understand the relationship between habitual physical activity and physical fitness, researchers have found that higher amount of time spent performing exercise (moderate-vigorous physical activity) and low-moderate level activity (steps) and less time spent sedentary, translated to greater physical fitness. They found dedicated exercise (moderate-vigorous physical activity) was the most efficient at improving fitness. Specifically, exercise was three times more efficient than walking alone and more than 14 times more efficient than reducing the time spent sedentary. Additionally, they found that the greater time spent exercising and higher steps/day could partially offset the negative effects of being sedentary in terms of physical fitness.

According to the researchers, while the study was focused on the relationship of physical activity and fitness specifically (rather than any health-related outcomes), fitness has a powerful influence on health and is associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and premature death. "Therefore, improved understanding of methods to improve fitness would be expected to have broad implications for improved health," said Nayor, a cardiologist at Boston Medical Center. COMMENT: PICK UP THE PACE. THIS GOES IN LINE WITH OUR SUGGESTION TO TRY HIIT A COUPLE OF TIMES A WEEK IF HEALTHY ENOUGH :) (STUDY)


It’s never too late to get active

Date:

August 24, 2021

Source:

European Society of Cardiology

Summary:

A study in more than 30,000 heart patients shows that becoming active later in life can be nearly as beneficial to survival as continued activity. Dr. Gonzalez said: "The results show that continuing an active lifestyle over the years is associated with the greatest longevity. However, patients with heart disease can overcome prior years of inactivity and obtain survival benefits by taking up exercise later in life. On the other hand, the benefits of activity can be weakened or even lost if activity is not maintained. The findings illustrate the benefits to heart patients of being physically active, regardless of their previous habits."


You’re cooler than you think! Hypothermia may go unnoticed when exercising in the cold

Date:

August 19, 2021

Source:

University of Tsukuba

Summary:

An exercise physiology study has demonstrated that perception of core body temperature is altered by low-intensity exercise in cold environments. The findings have provided important information about the role of temperature sensation in thermoregulation and suggest that, during activities performed in the water or in the winter, the possibility of accidental hypothermia should be kept in mind.


Eating walnuts daily lowered 'bad' cholesterol and may reduce cardiovascular disease risk

Date:

August 30, 2021

Source:

American Heart Association

Summary:

Healthy older adults who ate a handful of walnuts (about ½ cup) a day for two years modestly lowered their level of low-density lipoprotein or LDL cholesterol levels. Consuming walnuts daily also reduced the number of LDL particles, a predictor of cardiovascular disease risk. The study explored the effects of a walnut-enriched diet on overall cholesterol in elderly individuals from diverse geographical locations and spanning two years. "Prior studies have shown that nuts in general, and walnuts in particular, are associated with lower rates of heart disease and stroke. One of the reasons is that they lower LDL-cholesterol levels, and now we have another reason: they improve the quality of LDL particles," said study co-author Emilio Ros, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Lipid Clinic at the Endocrinology and Nutrition Service of the Hospital Clínic of Barcelona in Spain. "LDL particles come in various sizes. Research has shown that small, dense LDL particles are more often associated with atherosclerosis, the plaque or fatty deposits that build up in the arteries. Our study goes beyond LDL cholesterol levels to get a complete picture of all of the lipoproteins and the impact of eating walnuts daily on their potential to improve cardiovascular risk."


Common pesticide may contribute to global obesity crisis

Chlorpyrifos slows down the burning of calories in the brown adipose tissue of mice fos

Date:

August 27, 2021

Source:

McMaster University

Summary:

Researchers discovered that chlorpyrifos, which is banned for use on foods in Canada but widely sprayed on fruits and vegetables in many other parts of the world, slows down the burning of calories in the brown adipose tissue of mice. Reducing this burning of calories, a process known as diet-induced thermogenesis, causes the body to store these extra calories, promoting obesity. Scientists made the discovery after studying 34 commonly used pesticides and herbicides in brown fat cells and testing the effects of chlorpyrifos in mice fed high calorie diets


Can isometric resistance training safely reduce high blood pressure?

Date:

August 20, 2021

Source:

University of New South Wales

Summary:

This very accessible and easy to perform intervention could have a strong effect on reducing blood pressure, say researchers. While aerobic and dynamic resistance exercise appear effective at reducing blood pressure, a new study led by UNSW Medicine & Health researchers has revealed isometric resistance training (IRT) as an emerging mode of exercise demonstrating effectiveness in reducing office blood pressure. Office blood pressure refers to your pressure when taken during a GP visit, for example. It is taken at one time-period, usually when you're sitting down. Currently, IRT is not recommended by several international guidelines for the management of high blood pressure. This was mostly due to concerns over its safety because the static nature of IRT causes blood pressure to increase markedly during exercise, particularly when performed using large muscle groups or at high intensity, compared to traditional strength exercise such as lifting weights or aerobic exercise such as walking or cycling. ( See Study ) COMMENT: THIS IS GOOD TO LEARN BECAUSE MANY CORE EXERCSIES (FORMS OF THE PLANKS, BRIDGES, AND BIRDDOGS) ARE ISOMETRIC. I OFTEN SUGGEST THOSE TO PEOPLE AS WELL AS ISOMETRIC WALL SQUATS AND OTHER REHAB BASED ISOMETRIC EXRCISES.


Gut bacteria and flavonoid-rich foods are linked and improve blood pressure levels

Date:

August 23, 2021

Source:

American Heart Association

Summary:

Flavonoids found in plants and plant foods such as berries, apples, tea, wine and dark chocolate are known to offer health benefits, including some protective effects on the cardiovascular system. A study of over 900 adults in Germany evaluated the quantity and frequency of eating flavonoid-rich foods and measured bacteria in the gut microbiome to determine if there was an association with blood pressure levels. ( See Study ) COMMENT: FEED YOUR GUT BACTERIA SO THEY CAN MAKE YOU HEALTHIER.


Ultraprocessed foods now comprise 2/3 of calories in children and teen diets

Date:

August 10, 2021

Source:

Tufts University

Summary:

Results from two decades of data show ultraprocessed foods have become a larger part of kids' and teens' diets with disparities by race and ethnicity.

The calories that children and adolescents consumed from ultraprocessed foods jumped from 61% to 67% of total caloric intake from 1999 to 2018, according to a new study from researchers at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy at Tufts University. Published August 10, 2021, in JAMA, the study analyzed dietary intake from 33,795 children and adolescents nationwide.


Benefits of time-restricted eating depend on age and sex

Not everyone benefits equally from TRE, but TRE has important health benefits for all

Date:

August 17, 2021

Source:

Salk Institute

Summary:

Time-restricted eating (TRE), a dietary regimen that restricts eating to specific hours, has garnered increased attention in weight-loss circles. A new study further shows that TRE confers multiple health benefits besides weight loss. The study also shows that these benefits may depend on sex and age. (STUDY)


Prior training can accelerate muscle growth even after extended idleness

Date:

August 18, 2021

Source:

University of Arkansas

Summary:

Skeletal muscles in mice appear to 'remember' prior training, aiding muscle growth and adaptability when retrained through exercise. According to a report by the American Psychological Association published in February 2021, 42% of American adults reported unintended weight gain since the COVID-19 pandemic began, averaging about 29 pounds.

For those who are still struggling to get back on track with their exercise routine, there is encouraging news: new research from the University of Arkansas indicates that prior training of muscles can accelerate muscle growth and response even after extended idleness. Getting back what was lost is likely easier than most people realize. SEE STUDY

COMMENT: THIS STUDY SUPPORTS THE ADAGE THAT TRAINED MUSCLES HAVE A MEMORY.


Study reveals missing link between high-fat diet, microbiota and heart disease

Date:

August 12, 2021

Source:

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Summary:

A high-fat diet disrupts the biology of the gut's inner lining and its microbial communities -- and promotes the production of a metabolite that may contribute to heart disease, according to a new study.


Eating more plant foods may lower heart disease risk in young adults, older women

Date:

August 4, 2021

Source:

American Heart Association

Summary:

Eating a plant-centered diet during young adulthood is associated with a lower risk of heart disease in middle age, according to a long-term study with about 30 years of follow-up. A separate study with about 15 years of follow-up found that eating more plant-based foods that have been shown to lower cholesterol, called the 'Portfolio Diet', is associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. A nutritionally rich, plant-centered diet is beneficial for cardiovascular health. A plant-centered diet is not necessarily vegetarian," Choi said. "People can choose among plant foods that are as close to natural as possible, not highly processed. We think that individuals can include animal products in moderation from time to time, such as non-fried poultry, non-fried fish, eggs and low-fat dairy." (Study)


Exercise improves health through changes on DNA

Date:

August 2, 2021

Source:

University of Copenhagen - The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

Summary:

Six weeks of physical exercise led to changes in the epigenetic information of skeletal muscle cells in young men. These changes took place in areas of the genome that have been linked to disease. Scientists say their research shows how exercise remodels DNA in skeletal muscle, so that new signals are established to keep the body healthy. (Study)


New study offers insight on how resistance training burns fat

Date:

August 9, 2021

Source:

University of Kentucky

Summary:

Findings from a new study add to growing evidence that resistance exercise has unique benefits for fat loss. Researchers found that resistance-like exercise regulates fat cell metabolism at a molecular level. The Department of Physiology and Center for Muscle Biology study published in the FASEB Journal found that resistance-like exercise regulates fat cell metabolism at a molecular level.

The study results in mice and humans show that in response to mechanical loading, muscle cells release particles called extracellular vesicles that give fat cells instructions to enter fat-burning mode.

Extracellular vesicles were initially understood as a way for cells to selectively eliminate proteins, lipids and RNA. Recently, scientists discovered that they also play a role in intercellular communication.

The study adds a new dimension to how skeletal muscle communicates with other tissues by using extracellular vesicles, says John McCarthy, Ph.D., study author and associate professor in the UK Department of Physiology.

"To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of how weight training initiates metabolic adaptations in fat tissue, which is crucial for determining whole-body metabolic outcomes," McCarthy said. "The ability of resistance exercise-induced extracellular vesicles to improve fat metabolism has significant clinical implications."

McCarthy's research team was led by post-doc Ivan Vechetti, now at the University of Nebraska, in collaboration with the Center for Muscle Biology, directed by Joseph Hamburg Endowed Professor Charlotte Peterson, Ph.D.

Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01DK119619


Cutting 250 calories daily and exercising may improve heart health in obese older adults

Date:

August 2, 2021

Source:

American Heart Association

Summary:

Among older adults with obesity, combining aerobic exercise with moderate reductions in total daily calories led to greater improvements in vascular health compared to exercise alone. Reducing calorie intake by approximately 250 calories per day may lead to significant weight loss and improve vascular health in older adults with obesity. COMMENT: I ALWAYS SAY A SLIGHT HEALTHY CHANGE CAN HAVE AN IMPACT. THIS STUDY POINTS TO THAT. (STUDY)


An overactive sweet tooth may spell trouble for our cellular powerplants

Date:

August 3, 2021

Source:

Van Andel Research Institute

Summary:

The average American eats roughly 22 teaspoons of added sugar a day -- more than three times the recommended amount for women and more than double the recommended amount for men. Although this overconsumption is known to contribute to diabetes and other disorders, the exact ways in which eating too much sugar sets the stage for metabolic diseases on a cellular level has been less clear. Now, a team has found that surplus sugar may cause our cellular powerplants -- called mitochondria -- to become less efficient, reducing their energy output. (STUDY) The average American eats roughly 22 teaspoons of added sugar a day -- more than three times the recommended amount for women and more than double the recommended amount for men.


Higher levels of omega-3 acids in the blood increases life expectancy by almost five years

A 1% increase in this substance in the blood is associated with a change in mortality risk similar to that of quitting smoking.

Date:

July 22, 2021

Source:

IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute)

Summary:

Researchers have found that omega-3 levels in blood erythrocytes are very good mortality risk predictors. The study used data from a long-term study group, the Framingham Offspring Cohort, which has been monitoring residents of this Massachusetts town, in the United States, since 1971 and concludes that, 'Having higher levels of these acids in the blood, as a result of regularly including oily fish in the diet, increases life expectancy by almost five years.’ (STUDY)


Exercise may boost kids’ vocabulary growth

New study suggests exercise can boost kids’ vocabulary growth

Date:

July 28, 2021

Source:

University of Delaware

Summary:

Swimming a few laps likely won't turn your child into the next Katie Ledecky or Michael Phelps, but it just might help them become the next J.K. Rowling or Stephen King. A recent study suggests aerobic exercise, such as swimming, can boost kids' vocabulary growth (STUDY). COMMENT: I ALWAYS SAID EXERCISE MAKES YOU SMARTER.


A fermented-food diet increases microbiome diversity and lowers inflammation, study finds

Date:

July 12, 2021

Source:

Stanford Medicine

Summary:

A diet rich in fermented foods enhances the diversity of gut microbes and decreases molecular signs of inflammation, according to researchers. Eating foods such as yogurt, kefir, fermented cottage cheese, kimchi and other fermented vegetables, vegetable brine drinks, and kombucha tea led to an increase in overall microbial diversity, with stronger effects from larger servings. "This is a stunning finding," said Justin Sonnenburg, PhD, an associate professor of microbiology and immunology. "It provides one of the first examples of how a simple change in diet can reproducibly remodel the microbiota across a cohort of healthy adults.” COMMENT: A HEALTHY MICROBIOME IS ESSENTIAL TO GOOD HEALTH. TALK TO YOUR DOCTORS ABOUT WAYS TO IMPROVE YOUR GUT MICROBIOME.


Championing chrononutrition with protein, the morning elixir for muscle growth

Date:

July 19, 2021

Source:

Waseda University

Summary:

Proteins are essential for body growth and muscle building. However, protein metabolism varies depending on the body's internal biological clock. Therefore, it is important to know how distribution of protein intake over the day affects muscles. Researchers have now found that consumption of proteins at breakfast increases muscle size and function in mice and humans, shedding light on the concept of 'Chrononutrition' that deals with the timing of diets to ensure organ health. Proteins constitute an essential dietary component that help in the growth and repair of the body. Composed of long chains of amino acids, proteins promote the growth of skeletal muscles, the group of muscles that help us move. Humans have been aware of the benefits of proteins for long. However, recent studies have shown that having the right amount of protein at the right time of the day is essential for proper growth. This is called 'Chrononutrition,' in which when you eat is as important as what and how you eat. (Study). COMMENT: THIS IS SOMETHING THAT THOSE WHO ARE LOOKING TO BUILD MUSCLE SHOULD BE AWARE OF.


Eating whole grains linked to smaller increases in waist size, blood pressure, blood sugar

Study in middle- to older-aged adults suggests whole grains may protect against heart disease

Date:

July 13, 2021

Source:

Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus

Summary:

A study finds middle- to older-aged adults who ate more servings of whole grains, compared to those who ate fewer, were more likely to have smaller increases in waist size, blood pressure, and blood sugar levels as they aged. All three are linked with increased risk of heart disease. "There are several reasons that whole grains may work to help people maintain waist size and reduce increases in the other risk factors. The presence of dietary fiber in whole grains can have a satiating effect, and the magnesium, potassium, and antioxidants may contribute to lowering blood pressure. Soluble fiber in particular may have a beneficial effect on post-meal blood sugar spikes," said Caleigh Sawicki. Sawicki did this work as part of her doctoral dissertation while a student at the Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University and while working with the Nutritional Epidemiology Team at the USDA HNRCA. (Study) COMMENT: WHOLE GRAINS ARE AN ESSENTIAL PART OF A HEALTHY DIET. THE PROBLEM IS OVERCONSUMPTION. ALWAYS UNDERSTAND THE CALORIES IN THE FOODS YOU EAT, BUT PLEASE EAT SOME TYPE OF WHOLE GRAIN THAT IS RIGHT FOR YOU.


Impulsiveness tied to faster eating in children, can lead to obesity

Research also suggests cravings after sight and/or smell of food linked to inability to self-soothe in kids

Date:

July 7, 2021

Source:

University at Buffalo

Summary:

The research sought to uncover the relationship between temperament and eating behaviors in early childhood. The findings are critical because faster eating and greater responsiveness to food cues have been linked to obesity risk in children. (Study). Children who eat slower are less likely to be extroverted and impulsive, according to a new study co-led by the University at Buffalo and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "This study established relationships between temperament and eating patterns in children; however, there is still the question of chicken-and-egg and which comes first?" says Faith. "Research that follows families over time is needed to untangle these developmental pathways.”


Lab analysis finds near-meat and meat not nutritionally equivalent

Neither is good or bad, they are just not the same, authors say

Date:

July 6, 2021

Source:

Duke University

Summary:

A research team's deeper examination of the nutritional content of plant-based meat alternatives, using metabolomics, shows they're as different as plants and animals. Beef contained 22 metabolites that the plant substitute did not. The plant-based substitute contained 31 metabolites that meat did not. The greatest distinctions occurred in amino acids, dipeptides, vitamins, phenols, and types of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids found in these products. "It is important for consumers to understand that these products should not be viewed as nutritionally interchangeable, but that's not to say that one is better than the other," said van Vliet, a self-described omnivore who enjoys a plant-heavy diet but also eats meat. "Plant and animal foods can be complementary, because they provide different nutrients.”


The Southern diet - fried foods and sugary drinks - may raise risk of sudden cardiac death

Date:

June 30, 2021

Source:

American Heart Association

Summary:

Participants in a large-scale study who more commonly consumed a Southern-style diet - high in added fats, fried foods, processed meats and sugary drinks - had a higher risk of sudden cardiac death than people who had lower adherence to a Southern-style diet. Regularly eating a Southern-style diet may increase the risk of sudden cardiac death, while routinely consuming a Mediterranean diet may reduce that risk, according to new research published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association, an open access journal of the American Heart Association.COMMENT: EAT A MEDITERRANEAN DIET, NOT A SOUTHERN DIET. (STUDY)


5-minute breathing workout lowers blood pressure as much as exercise, drugs

'Strength training for breathing muscles' holds promise for host of health benefits

Date:

June 30, 2021

Source:

University of Colorado at Boulder

Summary:

A new study shows that a breathing exercise known as Inspiratory Muscle Strength Training can reduce blood pressure in weeks, with benefits on par with daily exercise or medication. Developed in the 1980s as a way to help critically ill respiratory disease patients strengthen their diaphragm and other inspiratory (breathing) muscles, IMST involves inhaling vigorously through a hand-held device which provides resistance. Imagine sucking hard through a tube that sucks back.

Initially, when prescribing it for breathing disorders, doctors recommended a 30-minute-per-day regimen at low resistance. But in recent years, Craighead and colleagues have been testing whether a more time-efficient protocol -- 30 inhalations per day at high resistance, six days per week -- could also reap cardiovascular, cognitive and sports performance improvements.

For the new study, they recruited 36 otherwise healthy adults ages 50 to 79 with above normal systolic blood pressure (120 millimeters of mercury or higher). Half did High-Resistance IMST for six weeks and half did a placebo protocol in which the resistance was much lower.

After six weeks, the IMST group saw their systolic blood pressure (the top number) dip nine points on average, a reduction which generally exceeds that achieved by walking 30 minutes a day five days a week. That decline is also equal to the effects of some blood pressure-lowering drug regimens.

Even six weeks after they quit doing IMST, the IMST group maintained most of that improvement.

"We found that not only is it more time-efficient than traditional exercise programs, the benefits may be longer lasting," Craighead said. (Study) COMMENT: AGAIN THIS STUDY POINTS TO HOW IMPORTANT BREATHING IS TO YOUR OVERALL HEALTH.


Switching from Western diet to a balanced diet may reduce skin, joint inflammation

Foods high in sugar and fat disrupt the gut and trigger psoriasis flares

Date:

June 22, 2021

Source:

University of California - Davis Health

Summary:

Diet rich in sugar and fat leads to disruption in the gut's microbial culture and contributes to inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis. Research shows that switching to a more balanced diet restores the gut's health and suppresses inflammation. "It was quite surprising that a simple diet modification of less sugar and fat may have significant effects on psoriasis," said Zhenrui Shi, visiting assistant researcher in the UC Davis Department of Dermatology and lead author on the study. "These findings reveal that patients with psoriatic skin and joint disease should consider changing to a healthier dietary pattern."

(Study)


Running to music combats mental fatigue, study suggests

Date:

June 22, 2021

Source:

University of Edinburgh

Summary:

Listening to music while running might be the key to improving people's performance when they feel mentally fatigued a study suggests. The performance of runners who listened to a self-selected playlist after completing a demanding thinking task was at the same level as when they were not mentally fatigued, the research found. The study is the first to investigate the effect of listening to music playlists on endurance running capacity and performance when mentally fatigued. (Study)


Compounds derived from hops show promise as treatment for common liver disease

Date:

June 16, 2021

Source:

Oregon State University

Summary:

Research suggests a pair of compounds originating from hops can help thwart a dangerous buildup of fat in the liver known as hepatic steatosis. (Study)


Memory biomarkers confirm aerobic exercise helps cognitive function in older adults

Study conducted on older adults with familial and genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease

Date:

June 10, 2021

Source:

Florida Atlantic University

Summary:

Until now, systemic biomarkers to measure exercise effects on brain function and that link to relevant metabolic responses were lacking. A study shows a memory biomarker, myokine Cathepsin B (CTSB), increased in older adults following a 26-week structured aerobic exercise training. The positive association between CTSB and cognition, and the substantial modulation of lipid metabolites implicated in dementia, support the beneficial effects of exercise training on brain function and brain health in asymptomatic individuals at risk for Alzheimer’s.


Western diet may increase risk of gut inflammation, infection

Diet rich in sugar, fat damages immune cells in digestive tracts of mice

Date:

May 18, 2021

Source:

Washington University School of Medicine

Summary:

Eating a Western diet impairs the immune system in the gut in ways that could increase risk of infection and inflammatory bowel disease, according to a new studyWestern diet may increase risk of gut inflammation, infection. "Inflammatory bowel disease has historically been a problem primarily in Western countries such as the U.S., but it's becoming more common globally as more and more people adopt Western lifestyles," said lead author Ta-Chiang Liu, MD, PhD, an associate professor of pathology & immunology at Washington University. "Our research showed that long-term consumption of a Western-style diet high in fat and sugar impairs the function of immune cells in the gut in ways that could promote inflammatory bowel disease or increase the risk of intestinal infections.” (Study) COMMENT: WHAT IS A WESTERN DIET? Some consider a Western Diet one that involves high consumption of refined grains, red and processed meats, desserts, sweets, and other high-sugar foods, high-fat dairy products, fried foods, as well as pre-packaged foods. Want less inflammation then do not eat a Western Diet.


Diabetes remission diet also lowers blood pressure and reduces need for medication

Date:

May 31, 2021

Source:

Diabetologia

Summary:

New research published in Diabetologia has shown that if people achieve and maintain substantial weight loss to manage their type 2 diabetes, many can also effectively control their high blood pressure and stop or cut down on their anti-hypertensive medication.


People who eat a healthy diet including whole fruits may be less likely to develop diabetes

Research links fruit but not fruit juice to lower type 2 diabetes risk

Date:

June 2, 2021

Source:

The Endocrine Society

Summary:

A new study finds people who consume two servings of fruit per day have 36% lower odds of developing type 2 diabetes than those who consume less than half a serving. (STUDY). COMMENT: LIKE I ALWAYS SAY WHEN IT COMES TO YOUR MEAL THINK WHERE YOU ARE GOING TO GET YOUR FRUIT AND VEGGIES FIRST.


Women's mental health has higher association with dietary factors

Exercise could reduce negative association of certain food and mental distress in mature women

Date:

June 9, 2021

Source:

Binghamton University

Summary:

Women's mental health likely has a higher association with dietary factors than men's, according to new research. (STUDY) "We found a general relationship between eating healthy, following healthy dietary practices, exercise and mental well-being," said Begdache. "Interestingly, we found that for unhealthy dietary patterns, the level of mental distress was higher in women than in men, which confirmed that women are more susceptible to unhealthy eating than men.” COMMENT: WOMEN AND MEN SHOULD UNDERSTAND THE LINK BETWEEN DIET AND MENTAL HEALTH. SO IF YOU WANT TO FEEL BETTER BOTH MENTALLY AND PHYSICALLY EAT BETTER.


New research may explain why some people derive more benefits from exercise than others

Date:

May 27, 2021

Source:

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Summary:

A new study published led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) provides insights related to mechanistic links between physical fitness and overall health and the reasons why the same exercise can have different effects in different people. (Study). COMMENT: THIS IS YET ANOTHER REASON WHY SOME PEOPLE ARE BETTER AT AEROBIC EXERCISES THAN OTHERS.


Exercise likely to be best treatment for depression in coronary heart disease

Date:

June 8, 2021

Source:

RCSI

Summary:

A study indicates that exercise is probably the most effective short-term treatment for depression in people with coronary heart disease, when compared to antidepressants and psychotherapy or more complex care.

(STUDY). COMMENT: AGAIN ANOTHER STUDY SHOWING THE POSITIVE EFFECTS OF EXERCISE ON MENTAL HEALTH.


Stair climbing offers significant cardiovascular and muscular benefits for heart patients

Date:

May 17, 2021

Source:

McMaster University

Summary:

A team of researchers who studied heart patients found that stair-climbing routines, whether vigorous or moderate, provide significant cardiovascular and muscular benefits. The findings, published in closely related studies in the journals Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise and Frontiers, address the most frequently cited barriers to exercise: time, equipment and access to gym facilities.

"Brief, vigorous stair-climbing and traditional moderate intensity exercise both changed fitness, which is a key predictor of mortality after a cardiac event," says Maureen MacDonald, one of the lead researchers on both studies and a professor in McMaster's Department of Kinesiology.

"We've shown stair-climbing is a safe, efficient and feasible option for cardiac rehabilitation, which is particularly relevant during the pandemic when many people don't have the option to exercise in a gym," she says.

STUDY

COMMENT: AGAIN ANOTHER STUDY POINTS TO THE BENEFITS OF A LITTLE AGGRESSIVE EXERCISE LIKE STEPPING. NO NEED FOR EQUIPMENT. JUST TAKE MINUTES.


Taking more steps daily may lead to a longer life

Date:

May 20, 2021

Source:

American Heart Association

Summary:

Taking more steps per day, either all at once or in shorter spurts, may help you live longer. The benefits of more daily steps occurred with both uninterrupted bouts of steps (10 minutes or longer) and short spurts such as climbing stairs.

Researchers found:

          Overall, 804 deaths occurred during the entire study period of 2011-2019.

          Study participants who took more steps in short spurts lived longer, regardless of how many steps they had in longer, uninterrupted bouts. The benefits leveled off at about 4,500 steps per day in short spurts.

          Compared to no daily steps, each initial increase of 1,000 steps per day was associated with a 28% decrease in death during the follow-up period.

          A 32% decrease in death was noted in participants who took more than 2,000 steps daily in uninterrupted bouts. STUDY

COMMENT: GET THOSE STEPS UP 4500 OR MORE A DAY


How tendons become stiffer and stronger

Date:

May 24, 2021

Source:

ETH Zurich

Summary:

Researchers deciphered the cellular mechanisms through which tendons can adapt to mechanical stresses. People who carry a certain variant of a gene that is key to this mechanism show improved jumping performance. STUDY

COMMENT: GENES MATTER


'Prescription' to sit less, move more advised for mildly high blood pressure and cholesterol

Date:

June 2, 2021

Source:

American Heart Association

Summary:

Physical activity is the optimal first treatment choice for adults with mild to moderately elevated blood pressure and blood cholesterol who otherwise have low heart disease risk. About 21% of adults in the US with mild to moderately raised blood pressure and 28-37% of those with mild to moderate elevated cholesterol levels may be best served by a prescription for lifestyle-only treatment, which includes increasing physical activity. "In our world where physical activity is increasingly engineered out of our lives and the overwhelming default is to sit -- and even more so now as the nation and the world is practicing quarantine and isolation to reduce the spread of coronavirus -- the message that we must be relentless in our pursuit to 'sit less and move more' throughout the day is more important than ever," said Gibbs. STUDY

COMMENT: MOVEMENT MAY BE THE BEST INITIAL TREATMENT


Different physical activity 'cocktails' have similar health benefits

Date:

May 19, 2021

Source:

Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Summary:

A new study describes multiple ways to achieve the same health benefits from exercise -- as long as your exercise 'cocktail' includes plenty of light physical activity. STUDY

Light physical activity is more important than you think.

The research found that people who spent just a few minutes engaging in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity lowered their risk of early death by 30% as long as they also spent six hours engaging in light physical activity.

A cocktail formula of 3 to 1 is best.

The researchers found that getting three minutes of moderate-to-vigorous activity or 12 minutes of light activity per hour of sitting was optimal for improving health and reducing the risk of early death.

"Our new formula gets at the right balance between moderate-to-vigorous exercise and sitting to help people lead a longer, healthier life," says Chastin. "The leftover hours should be spent moving around as much as possible and getting a good night's sleep."

Using this basic formula, the study found that multiple combinations of activities reduced the risk of early death by 30%:

          55 minutes of exercise, 4 hours of light physical activity, and 11 hours of sitting

          13 minutes of exercise, 5.5 hours of light physical activity, and 10.3 hours of sitting

          3 minutes of exercise, 6 hours of light physical activity, and 9.7 hours of sitting

COMMENT: LIKE I ALWAYS SAY “KEEP MOVING” AND “YOUR NEXT POSTURE IS YOUR BEST” “WE ARE BUILT TO MOVE” “GOOD MOTION IS LOTION FOR YOUR JOINTS”-ADD MORE LIGHT ACTIVITY TO YOUR DAY. HEPA filter effectively reduces airborne respiratory particles generated during vigorous exercise, researchers find

Date:

May 4, 2021

Source:

Mayo Clinic

Summary:

A pair of studies shed light on something that is typically difficult to see with the eye: respiratory aerosols. Such aerosol particles of varying sizes are a common component of breath, and they are a typical mode of transmission for respiratory viruses like COVID-19 to spread to other people and surfaces. (See Study).


One cup of leafy green vegetables a day lowers risk of heart disease

Date:

May 4, 2021

Source:

Edith Cowan University

Summary:

New research has found that by eating just one cup of nitrate-rich vegetables each day people can significantly reduce their risk of heart disease. (See Study).


Study strengthens links between red meat and heart disease

Date:

April 15, 2021

Source:

European Society of Cardiology

Summary:

An observational study in nearly 20,000 individuals has found that greater intake of red and processed meat is associated with worse heart function. (See study) COMMENT: We have always preached reduction of red meat consumption. We recommend noe to no more than 2 x a week for a variety of reasons.


Why some of us are hungry all the time

Date:

April 12, 2021

Source:

King's College London

Summary:

New research shows that people who experience big dips in blood sugar levels, several hours after eating, end up feeling hungrier and consuming hundreds more calories during the day than others.Dr Sarah Berry from King's College London said, "It has long been suspected that blood sugar levels play an important role in controlling hunger, but the results from previous studies have been inconclusive. We've now shown that sugar dips are a better predictor of hunger and subsequent calorie intake than the initial blood sugar peak response after eating, changing how we think about the relationship between blood sugar levels and the food we eat.” COMMENT: One of our key goals is good metabolic control of our members, which is good control of blood sugar. We need to develop a more robust body that does not have blood sugar dips for a variety of health reasons. (See Study)


More belly weight increases danger of heart disease even if BMI does not indicate obesity

Date:

April 22, 2021

Source:

American Heart Association

Summary:

Research on how obesity impacts the diagnosis, management and outcomes of heart and blood vessel disease, heart failure and arrhythmias is summarized in a new statement. Waist circumference, an indicator of abdominal obesity, should be regularly measured as it is a potential warning sign of increased cardiovascular disease risk. Interventions that lead to weight loss improve risk factors yet may not always lead to improvement in coronary artery disease outcomes.

People with abdominal obesity and excess fat around the body's mid-section and organs have an increased risk of heart disease even if their body mass index (BMI) measurement is within a healthy weight range, according to a new Scientific Statement from the American Heart Association published today in the Association's flagship journal, Circulation. COMMENT: Decreasing belly fat is one of our key goals for our members. (See scientific statement)


Long-term weight retention and associated health risks identified in obese adults

Date:

April 14, 2021

Source:

BMC (BioMed Central)

Summary:

UK adults who are overweight or obese retain their weight over time, which is associated with an increased risk of health complications and death, according to a new study. (See study)


Keeping fit with HIIT really does work

Short bursts of activity you can easily do at home keep your fitness up

Date:

April 15, 2021

Source:

The Physiological Society

Summary:

Recently, researchers have been studying whether shorter variations of HIIT, involving as little as 4-min of high intensity exercise per session (excluding a warm up and cool down), also improve health. A new review paper collates a decade's worth of research on the topic of this so-called low-volume high HIIT for health. The findings of this study show that low-volume HIIT (typically involving less than ~20 mins total exercise time -- inclusive of warm up and cool down) yields comparable improvements to interventions meeting the current guidelines despite requiring significantly less time.

So, what is low-volume HIIT? As HIIT involves active periods of work interspersed with recovery periods, the researchers defined low-volume HIIT as interventions which included less than 15 minutes of high intensity exercise per session (not including recovery periods).(See study) COMMENT: THIS STUDY REINFORCES OUR FOCUS OF GETTING OUR MEMBERS TO DO SOME VERSION OF HIIT A COUPLE TIMES A WEEK, EVEN FOR A FEW MINUTES. Remember intensity is relative. What someone might find hard another might find easy. We would like you to work hard a few minutes a couple times a week.


Prehistoric Pacific Coast diets had salmon limits

Date:

April 12, 2021

Source:

Washington State University

Summary:

Humans cannot live on protein alone - even for the ancient indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest whose diet was once thought to be almost all salmon. Anthropologists argue such a protein-heavy diet would be unsustainable and document the many dietary solutions ancient Pacific Coast people in North America likely employed to avoid 'salmon starvation,' a toxic and potentially fatal condition brought on by eating too much lean protein. (see study)


IMPORTANT STUDY

Leisure physical activity is linked with health benefits but work activity is not

Date:

April 8, 2021

Source:

European Society of Cardiology

Summary:

The first large study showing that leisure time physical activity and occupational physical activity have opposite, and independent, associations with cardiovascular disease risk and longevity. During a median follow-up of 10 years, there were 9,846 (9.5%) deaths from all causes and 7,913 (7.6%) major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE, defined as fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction, fatal and non-fatal stroke, and other coronary death). (SEE STUDY)

COMMENT: I was shocked by this.

I feel this is is important because even though production and lab people may get a good deal of activity in their day doing production/lab work it does not equate to the same benefit of exercise, especially exercise that elevates heart rate.


Compared to low leisure time physical activity, after adjustment for age, sex, lifestyle, health, and education, moderate, high, and very high activity were associated with 26%, 41%, and 40% reduced risks of early death, respectively. In contrast, compared to low work activity, high and very high activity were associated with 13% and 27% increased risks of death, respectively.


Similarly, after adjustments, compared to low leisure activity, moderate, high, and very high levels of leisure activity were associated with 14%, 23%, and 15% reduced risks of MACE, respectively. Compared to low work activity, high and very high levels were associated with 15% and 35% increased risks of MACE, respectively.


Professor Holtermann said: "Many people with manual jobs believe they get fit and healthy by their physical activity at work and therefore can relax when they get home. Unfortunately, our results suggest that this is not the case. And while these workers could benefit from leisure physical activity, after walking 10,000 steps while cleaning or standing seven hours in a production line, people tend to feel tired so that's a barrier.”


While the study did not investigate the reasons for the opposite associations for occupational and leisure time physical activity, Professor Holtermann said: "A brisk 30-minute walk will benefit your health by raising your heart rate and improving your cardiorespiratory fitness, while work activity often does not sufficiently increase heart rate to improve fitness. In addition, work involving lifting for several hours a day increases blood pressure for many hours, which is linked with heart disease risk, while short bursts of intense physical activity during leisure raises blood pressure only briefly.”


Keep pace: Walking with a partner is great but might slow you down

Date:

April 2, 2021

Source:

Purdue University

Summary:

A new study shows that couples often decreased their speed when walking together. Speed further decreased if they were holding hands. (SEE STUDY)


Cardiorespiratory fitness improves grades at school

Date:

March 30, 2021

Source:

Université de Genève

Summary:

Studies indicate a link between children's cardiorespiratory fitness and their school performance: the more athletic they are, the better their marks in the main subjects. Similarly, cardiorespiratory fitness is known to benefit cognitive abilities. But what is the real influence of such fitness on school results? Researchers tested pupils from eight Geneva schools. Their results show that there is an indirect link with cardiorespiratory fitness influencing cognitive abilities, which in turn, influence school results. (See Study)


Exercise, healthy diet in midlife may prevent serious health conditions in senior years

Date:

March 31, 2021

Source:

American Heart Association

Summary:

Regular exercise and a healthy diet for middle-aged adults may be key to achieving optimal cardiometabolic health later in life. Cardiometabolic health risk factors include the metabolic syndrome, a cluster of health conditions such as excess body fat around the waist, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels that increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and Type 2 diabetes. (See Study)


Kids' metabolic health can be improved with exercise during pregnancy: here's why

Date:

March 30, 2021

Source:

Joslin Diabetes Center

Summary:

Many previous studies have linked increased maternal body weight and unhealthy diets to poorer metabolic outcomes in offspring, often many years later. Understanding the mechanisms of how maternal exercise can reverse these effects might lead to interventions that prevent these diseases transmitting across generations.


Fasting can be an effective way to start a diet

Date:

March 30, 2021

Source:

Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association

Summary:

Those who need to change their eating habits to normalize their blood pressure should start with a fast. Scientists explain why patients can use it as a tool to improve their health in the long term.


More protein doesn't mean more strength in resistance-trained middle-aged adults

Date:

March 25, 2021

Source:

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau

Summary:

A 10-week muscle-building and dietary program involving 50 middle-aged adults found no evidence that eating a high-protein diet increased strength or muscle mass more than consuming a moderate amount of protein while training. The intervention involved a standard strength-training protocol with sessions three times per week. None of the participants had previous weightlifting experience. COMMENT: THIS IS CONSISTENT WITH WHAT I HAVE SAID TO PEOPLE IN THE PAST THAT AN ADEQUATE AMOUNT OF PROTEIN IS ENOUGH TO HELP YOU BUILD MUSCLE. SEE STUDY "The moderate-protein group consumed about 1.2 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day (WHICH IS MORE THAN THE RDA), and the high-protein group consumed roughly 1.6 grams per kilogram per day," said Colleen McKenna, a graduate student in the division of nutritional sciences and registered dietician at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign who led the study with U. of I. kinesiology and community health professor Nicholas Burd.


Physical activity helps curb low-grade inflammation in children

Low physical activity, unhealthy diet quality, and being overweight is the most unfavourable combination

Date:

March 23, 2021

Source:

University of Jyväskylä - Jyväskylän yliopisto

Summary:

According to a recent study, accumulating more brisk and vigorous physical activity can curb adiposity-induced low-grade inflammation. The study also reported that diet quality had no independent association with low-grade inflammation. (SEE STUDY)


Cells burn more calories after just one bout of moderate aerobic exercise, OSU study finds

Date:

March 22, 2021

Source:

Oregon State University

Summary:

In a recent study testing the effects of exercise on overall metabolism, researchers found that even a single session of moderate aerobic exercise makes a difference in the cells of otherwise sedentary people. (SEE STUDY)


Frequent consumption of meals prepared away from home linked to increased risk of early death

Date:

March 25, 2021

Source:

Elsevier

Summary:

Dining out is a popular activity worldwide, but there has been little research into its association with health outcomes. Investigators looked at the association between eating out and risk of death and concluded that eating out very frequently is significantly associated with an increased risk of all-cause death, which warrants further investigation. (SEE STUDY) COMMENT: WHEN YOU PREPARE AND EAT AT HOME YOU CAN CONTROL YOUR CALORIES AND THE QUALITY OF YOUR FOOD MUCH BETTER.


Eating processed meat could increase dementia risk, researchers say

Date:

March 21, 2021

Source:

University of Leeds

Summary:

Eating processed meat has been linked with an increased risk of developing dementia, say researchers exploring a potential link between consumption of meat and development of dementia. COMMENT: ANOTHER REASON WHY YOU SHOULD NOT EAT PROCESSED MEATS. (SEE STUDY)


Should you take fish oil? Depends on your genotype

Date:

March 25, 2021

Source:

University of Georgia

Summary:

Fish oil supplements are a billion-dollar industry built on a foundation of purported, but not proven, health benefits. Now, new research indicates that taking fish oil only provides health benefits if you have the right genetic makeup. ——-. But if you do not have that right genotype, taking a fish oil supplement actually increases your triglycerides."(SEE STUDY) COMMENT: I CAN NOT RECOMMEND SUPPLEMENTS AS A HEALTH COACH. I DO TAKE FISH OIL.


In women, higher body fat may protect against heart disease death, study shows

Date:

March 16, 2021

Source:

University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Summary:

A new study shows that while men and women who have high muscle mass are less likely to die from heart disease, it also appears that women who have higher levels of body fat -- regardless of their muscle mass -- have a greater degree of protection than women with less fat. See study


Pick up the pace! Slow walkers four times more likely to die from COVID-19, study finds

Date:

March 16, 2021

Source:

University of Leicester

Summary:

Slow walkers are almost four times more likely to die from COVID-19, and have over twice the risk of contracting a severe version of the virus, according to researchers in a new study. See study The analysis found slow walkers of a normal weight to be almost 2.5 times more likely to develop severe COVID-19 and 3.75 times more likely to die from the virus than normal weight fast walkers.


Exercise during pregnancy may save kids from health problems as adults

Parental obesity predisposes children to develop diabetes, metabolic issues

Date:

March 15, 2021

Source:

University of Virginia Health System

Summary:

One day soon, a woman's first trip to the doctor after conceiving may include a prescription for an exercise program. See study


Eating before 8:30 a.m. could reduce risk factors for type 2 diabetes

Intermittent fasting study finds eating earlier was associated with lower blood sugar levels and insulin resistance

Date:

March 18, 2021

Source:

The Endocrine Society

Summary:

People who start eating before 8:30 a.m. had lower blood sugar levels and less insulin resistance, which could reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a new study.

People who start eating before 8:30 a.m. had lower blood sugar levels and less insulin resistance, which could reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study presented virtually at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting.

"We found people who started eating earlier in the day had lower blood sugar levels and less insulin resistance, regardless of whether they restricted their food intake to less than 10 hours a day or their food intake was spread over more than 13 hours daily," said lead researcher Marriam Ali, M.D., of Northwestern University in Chicago, Ill. See study


High fat diets may over-activate destructive heart disease protein

Date:

March 2, 2021

Source:

University of Reading

Summary:

Consumption of a high fat diet may be activating a response in the heart that is causing destructive growth and lead to greater risk of heart attacks, according to new research. (See Study)


Deciphering the genetics behind eating disorders

Date:

March 1, 2021

Source:

Université de Genève

Summary:

By analysing the genome of tens of thousand people, a team has discovering similarities between the genetic bases of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or binge-eating disorder, and those of psychiatric disorders. Eating disorders differ in their genetic association with anthropometric traits. Thus, genetic predisposition to certain weight traits may be a distinctive feature of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or binge-eating disorder. (see study)


The right '5-a-day' mix is 2 fruit and 3 vegetable servings for longer life

Date:

March 1, 2021

Source:

American Heart Association

Summary:

Higher consumption of fruits and vegetables is associated with a lower risk of death in men and women, according to data representing nearly 2 million adults. Five daily servings of fruits and vegetables, eaten as 2 servings of fruit and 3 servings of vegetables, may be the optimal amount and combination for a longer life. These findings support current U.S. dietary recommendations to eat more fruits and vegetables and the simple public health message '5-a-day.' COMMENT: Like I always say when it comes to a meal think where you are going to get your fruits and veggies from first. See Study


Belly fat resistant to every-other-day fasting

Studies in mice show fat location matters for intermittent fasting

Date:

March 3, 2021

Source:

University of Sydney

Summary:

Scientists have mapped out what happens to fat deposits during intermittent fasting (every second day), with an unexpected discovery that some types of fat are more resistant to weight loss. (see study)


Accelerating gains in abdominal fat during menopause tied to heart disease risk

Date:

March 3, 2021

Source:

University of Pittsburgh

Summary:

Women who experience an accelerated accumulation of abdominal fat during menopause are at greater risk of heart disease, even if their weight stays steady, according to a new analysis. The study -- based on a quarter century of data collected on hundreds of women -- indicates that measuring waist circumference during preventive health care appointments for midlife women could be a better early indicator of heart disease risk than weight or BMI. COMMENT: Like I always say the abdomen circumference next to blood pressure are some of the important biomarkers that you should measure regularly. (see study)


Excess body weight linked with worse heart health even in people who exercise

Date:

January 22, 2021

Source:

European Society of Cardiology

Summary:

Physical activity does not undo the negative effects of excess body weight on heart health, according to a new study. See study From study overweight and obese participants were at greater cardiovascular risk than their peers with normal weight, irrespective of activity levels. As an example, compared to inactive normal weight individuals, active obese people were approximately twice as likely to have high cholesterol, four times more likely to have diabetes, and five times more likely to have high blood pressure. Dr. Lucia said: "Exercise does not seem to compensate for the negative effects of excess weight. This finding was also observed overall in both men and women when they were analysed separately." COMMENT: EXCESS WEIGHT IMPACTS YOUR HEALTH......


Mediterranean-style diet linked to better thinking skills in later life

Date:

February 10, 2021

Source:

University of Edinburgh

Summary:

People who eat a Mediterranean-style diet -- particularly one rich in green leafy vegetables and low in meat -- are more likely to stay mentally sharp in later life, a study shows. Closely adhering to a Mediterranean diet was associated with higher scores on a range of memory and thinking tests among adults in their late 70s, the research found. The study found no link, however, between the Mediterranean-style diet and better brain health. See Study COMMENT: MORE AMMO TO THE DIET I FOLLOW :)


Study compares low-fat, plant-based diet to low-carb, animal-based diet

Date:

January 21, 2021

Source:

NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Summary:

People on a low-fat, plant-based diet ate fewer daily calories but had higher insulin and blood glucose levels, compared to when they ate a low-carbohydrate, animal-based diet, according to a small but highly controlled study. The study compared the effects of the two diets on calorie intake, hormone levels, body weight, and more. The main results showed that people on the low-fat diet ate 550 to 700 fewer calories per day than when they ate the low-carb diet. Despite the large differences in calorie intake, participants reported no differences in hunger, enjoyment of meals, or fullness between the two diets. Participants lost weight on both diets, but only the low-fat diet led to a significant loss of body fat.

"Despi

Link between gut microbes, diet and illnesses revealed

Date:

January 11, 2021

Source:

King's College London

Summary:

Diets rich in healthy and plant-based foods encourages the presence of gut microbes that are linked to a lower risk of common illnesses including heart disease, research has found. see more COMMENT: AGAIN THIS STUDY SHOWS THE IMPORTANCE OF A HEALTHY GUT MICROBE, WICH IS BUILT ON A HEALTHY DIET-SEE Mediterranean diet.


Mediterranean diet may decrease risk of prostate cancer progression

Date:

January 7, 2021

Source:

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Summary:

In a study to examine a Mediterranean diet in relation to prostate cancer progression in men on active surveillance, researchers found that men with localized prostate cancer who reported a baseline dietary pattern that more closely follows the key principles of a Mediterranean-style diet fared better over the course of their disease. COMMENT: AGAIN THIS STUDY SHOWS THE IMPORTANCE OF A DIET I HIGHLY RECOMMEND


Low fitness linked to higher psoriasis risk later in life

Date:

January 12, 2021

Source:

University of Gothenburg

Summary:

Scientists have now demonstrated a connection between inferior physical fitness in young adults and elevated risk of the autoimmune disease psoriasis. For the male recruits to compulsory military training who were rated as the least fit, the risk of developing psoriasis later was 35 percent higher than for the fittest. see more


No limit to cardiovascular benefits of exercise, study finds

Date:

January 12, 2021

Source:

PLOS

Summary:

Physical activity is not only associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, but there is no threshold for that association, with the lowest risk of cardiovascular disease seen for those who are most active, according to a new study. see more COMMENT: SHOWS MORE CARDIO ENHANCEMENT THE HEALTHIER YOU WILL BE


Not just a guys' club: Resistance training benefits older women just as much as older men

Date:

January 7, 2021

Source:

University of New South Wales

Summary:

Men and women aged over 50 can reap similar relative benefits from resistance training, a new study shows. see more COMMENT: EVERYONE CAN BENEFIIT FROM STRENGTH TRAINING


MIND and Mediterranean diets associated with later onset of Parkinson's disease

Date:

January 13, 2021

Source:

University of British Columbia

Summary:

A new study suggests a strong correlation between following the MIND and Mediterranean diets and later onset of Parkinson's disease (PD). While researchers have long known of neuroprotective effects of the MIND diet for diseases like Alzheimer's and dementia, this study is the first to suggest a link between this diet and brain health for Parkinson's disease (PD). see more COMMENT: AGAIN THIS STUDY SHOWS THE IMPORTANCE OF A DIET I HIGHLY RECOMMEND



1/1/21

New Dietary Guidelines for Americans-What is new!

'Ultraprocessed' is the new way of talking about foods that should not be consumed regularly or in large amounts — tons of evidence has come in within the last five years. It is the main food sources of sugar, saturated fat and salt, which need to be limited. ‘Ultraprocessed’ was not included because the independence of the 2020 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee was removed by the federal government. There is still a lot of good in it and it should be followed but try to limit ‘Ultraprocessed’ foods.

What are ‘Ultraprocessed’ foods.

• The committee report suggested reducing current guidance from two drinks for men and one drink a day for women to one drink a day for both women and men.

• The committee had also recommended that no amount of added sugar is OK for a baby's development.

• "For about the first 6 months of life, exclusively feed infants human milk. Continue to feed infants human milk through at least the first year of life, and longer if desired," the new guidelines stated, adding that if human milk is unavailable parents and guardians should feed infants "iron-fortified" formula during the first year of life.

• The guidance states that a "healthy dietary pattern" consists of nutrient-dense forms of foods and beverages across all food groups, in recommended amounts, and within calorie limits. These foods consist of protein, oils, dairy, vegetables, grains and fruits.

• This pattern includes dark green, red and orange vegetables, beans, peas, lentils and other starches, whole fruits and whole grains, as well as vegetable oils, lean meats, poultry, eggs, nuts, fat-free or low-fat milk, yogurt and cheese.

• And lastly, the final guideline is to "limit foods and beverages higher in added sugars, saturated fat, and sodium, and limit alcoholic beverages, at every life stage." see more here

• The American Institute for Cancer Research also suggested that the recommendations don't fully represent research about the health benefits of reducing the intake of processed meats and added sugars beyond the 10% of calories recommended by the new guidelines.

The guidelines don't touch on the topic of red meat -- a major supplier of saturated fat in the American diet and a huge player in the argument over food sustainability and environmental impact. Instead, the guidelines suggest replacing processed or high-fat meats, like hot dogs, sausages and bacon, with seafood or beans, peas and lentils to meet protein recommendations. They also suggest that the majority of meat and poultry a person consumes should be fresh, frozen or canned, and in lean forms, like chicken breast or ground turkey, rather than processed meats like ham or other deli meat.



Three pillars of mental health: Good sleep (sleep quality), exercise, raw fruits and veggies

Date:

December 16, 2020

Source:

University of Otago

Summary:

Getting good quality sleep, exercising, and eating more raw fruits and vegetables predicts better mental health and well-being in young adults, a study has found."This is surprising because sleep recommendations predominantly focus on quantity rather than quality. While we did see that both too little sleep -- less than eight hours -- and too much sleep -- more than 12 hours -- were associated with higher depressive symptoms and lower well-being, sleep quality significantly outranked sleep quantity in predicting mental health and well-being. COMMENT: IT IS NOT ABOUT JUST QUANTITY IT IS ABOUT QUALITY FOR GOOD HEALTH WHEN IT COMES TO SLEEP. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/12/201216094647.htm


Does sharing health data help maintain weight loss?

Drexel study suggests sharing self-monitored health data improves person's weight loss maintenance

Date:

December 14, 2020

Source:

Drexel University

Summary:

Research suggests that health counselors having access to self-monitored health data would improve a person's weight loss maintenance.

Creating healthy habits, like increasing physical activity and improving eating habits, can be difficult to maintain long term, especially without accountability. Research from the Center for Weight, Eating and Lifestyle Science (WELL Center) in the College of Arts and Sciences at Drexel University suggests that health counselors having access to self-monitored health data would improve a person's weight loss maintenance. COMMENTS: Working with coaches like us can help you reach your weigt loss goals. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/12/201214104726.htm


Test your heart health by climbing stairs

Date:

December 11, 2020

Source:

European Society of Cardiology

Summary:

Climbing four flights of stairs in less than a minute indicates good heart health, according to new research=60 STEPS. COMMENTS: I HAVE MENTIONED STAIR CLIMBING BEFORE. HERE YET AGAIN ANOTHER STUDY SHOWING ITS IMPORTANCE. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/12/201211083104.htm


The Use of Lifting Straps Alters the Entire Load-Velocity Profile During the Deadlift Exercise

https://journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/Abstract/2020/12000/The_Use_of_Lifting_Straps_Alters_the_Entire.6.aspx COMMENT: I DO NOT SUGGEST THE USE OF STRAPS OR BELTS IN MOST TRAINING PROGRAMS-THIS REINFORCES MY OPINION.


Effects of an Experimental vs. Traditional Military Training Program on 2-Mile Run Performance During the Army Physical Fitness Test

Thus, for short-term training of military personnel, RPE intensity-specific running program comprising aerobic and anaerobic system development can enhance 2-mile run performance superior to a traditional program while reducing training volume (60 minutes per session vs. 43.2 minutes per session, respectively). Future research should extend the training period to determine efficacy of this training approach for long-term improvement of aerobic capacity and possible reduction of musculoskeletal injury.

https://journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/Abstract/2020/12000/Effects_of_an_Experimental_vs__Traditional.18.aspx COMMENT: ANOTHER STUDY POINTING TO HIIT ON PERFORMANCE.


Effects of Low-Load, Higher-Repetition vs. High-Load, Lower-Repetition Resistance Training Not Performed to Failure on Muscle Strength, Mass, and Echo Intensity in Healthy Young Men: A Time-Course Study The lack of difference in time-course changes between LLHR and HLLR programs suggests that low-load training can exert similar effects on muscle mass and characteristics as high-load training by increasing the number of repetitions, even when not performed to failure.https://journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/Abstract/2020/12000/Effects_of_Low_Load,_Higher_Repetition_vs_.19.aspx COMMENT: ANOTHER STUDY SHOWING THAT YOU DO NOT HAVE TO DO HIGH LOAD TRAINING TO ELICIT MUSCULAR DEVELOPMENT.

2021

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